How to Turn an Arm Chair into Side Chair

You might remember these chairs from my post on How to Repair Scratches, Chew Marks and Gouges.    They had escaped the terror of living with a four-legged beast who used the legs as a chew toy.  Luckily, with one of my favorite Furniture CPR products , the chairs were rescued and restyled beautifully.  

The original set had eight (8) chairs and my client only needed six so she generously gave me two of the arm chairs.  They both needed a lot of work - one arm was broken off and there were lots of chew marks needing to be filled.

Since one arm was already completely off, we decided to go ahead and remove the arms to convert as side chairs.  I kind of feel like everyone needs a few extra side chairs but arm chairs are a different matter.  And these beauties will be for sale when it's all said and done.

After the arms were removed, there were even more holes to fill.  Once painted, the repairs will be so flawless no one will ever know they existed.  

Are you familiar with Minted?  It's an online marketplace where designers submit their artwork through design competitions and a voting process determines whether their products will be sold.

When Minted asked if I was interested in featuring some of their fabric, I remembered these chairs desperately needed a new 'outfit' for their makeover.  After perusing their site, I saw the Savonnerie design and knew it would help transform a classic Queen Anne into sleek and modern.

 SAVONNERIE BY MINTED.COM

SAVONNERIE BY MINTED.COM

We had thrown away the original seats long ago, so Triple Threat set to work cutting new ones from an extra piece of plywood we had on hand.  The old seats were inset down into the chair and we decided to change it up a bit by building the new seat to rest on top.  We felt this would make a more comfy chair so legs weren't left rubbing on the apron.  So thoughtful, I know.  :)

 NEW PLYWOOD SEAT

NEW PLYWOOD SEAT

To accent the new fabric, I decided to use Driftwood (one of my favorite grays) for the base coat.  

Even after one coat, you can't tell any repairs were made.  That's one example of why I love working on real wood furniture.  It can always (or at least almost always) be repaired.  You can't say the same thing for laminate or particle board.  

 ARM HOLES PATCHED & PAINTED

ARM HOLES PATCHED & PAINTED

Once the chairs were painted and sealed, I used the new plywood seat as a template to cut a 2 inch piece of foam.  

Next, I laid out my new Minted Savonnerie fabric and cut enough so there was 3 inches to wrap around the front/back and 5 inches per side to accommodate the tapered seat.

 READY, SET, COVER!

READY, SET, COVER!

My favorite part of the Minted fabric {other than the style} was it cut like a dream.  Usually, when I cut fabric there ends up being lots of runs and strings on the side I'm cutting.  That just means a little extra work of trimming involved for me.  Not this time...no sir.  The cut side was a completely clean, string-free edge.  Little things like this make such a huge difference, don't they?

After the new seats were recovered, it was time to attach them to the chairs.  

The driftwood paint was the perfect accent color to the Savonnerie fabric.  I am absolutely thrilled with this paint and fabric duo!

 AFTER

AFTER

These Queen Anne chairs are barely recognizable now from the mangled mess they started out.  They are now ready to begin a new, chew-free life. 

For sale and ready for a new forever home.  If you know of one, please let me know.

***Although Minted provided some materials that helped make this restyle possible, the opinions above are all mine.